Publications

Research Series

home Publications Research Series
인쇄

SNS공유하기

해당 컨텐츠 트위터에 추가하기 해당 컨텐츠 페이스북에 추가하기

Shift in the Job Policy Paradigm and Challenges for Institutional Improvement in the Labor Market Institution
Shift in the Job Policy Paradigm and Challenges for Institutional Improvement in the Labor Market Institution
  • Table of Contents

    Chapter 1. Introduction (Jai-Joon Hur)

    Chapter 2. Driving Factors of Paradigm Shift in Job Policy (Jai-Joon Hur)

    Chapter 3. Mini Jobs: Status of Workers and Their Protection (Injae Lee)

    Chapter 4. Changes in the Labor Contract and Fair Labor Commission (Hyuk Kwon)

    Chapter 5. Improving the Compensation Structure to Promote Innovation-driven SMEs (Dongbae Kim)

    Chapter 6. Policy Challenges (Jai-Joon Hur)

     

  • SUMMARY

    This study focuses on how to do rather than what to do in policymaking and institutional improvement in the labor market of Korea based on observations of the current situation in the midst of a digital transition. 

    The digital transition is marked by slowing employment rate growth and reduced supply of decent jobs. Given that employment rate growth in traditional industries is bound to be limited, employment situation is expected to be dependent on the briskness of business start-ups for the time being. Labor supply outlook for the next decade is not gloomy despite the aging of the population. Economic growth is slowing down faster than productive population due to limited increase in productivity. The dual structure of the labor market is overwhelmingly determined by the productivity gap by company size. Based on the foregoing diagnosis, Chapter 2 identifies tasks for policy and institutional improvement with an eye toward strengthening adaptability to change. It will focus on how to rationalize start-up regulations, and how the government and stakeholders must change, rather than on what to do.

    Mini jobs are wage work of fewer than 15 hours per week. Most mini job workers do not have other jobs or side jobs. The choice of the mini job is presumed to be voluntary. Women account for 71.5% of this workforce. Age distribution is concentrated in the youth and elderly groups. Coverage of retirement pay, bonus, overtime pay, paid vacation and vacation availability all falls much below 10%. For the mini job workforce that consists of workers of diverse human and labor market characteristics, it is important that the policy also makes room for such diversity instead of trying to impose blanket rules. Legal exemptions for this worker category should be gradually reduced while granting the workers the right to choose the legal application. For example, if the weekly break is made non-paid but offset with a corresponding increase in wage, it can mitigate the negative impact of current rules that structurally discriminate against mini job workers and help improve the polarization index. This is the gist of Chapter 3.

    Unprecedented changes are taking place in employment contract. Outsourcing of service and labor subcontracting have become prevalent. More and more individual labor providers are supplying labor and earning income in the form of self-employment. These trends hint at the need to seek alternatives to the approach toward institutional improvement in the labor market in a way that is not bound by the rigid labor rules of the written law tradition and has the flexibility of unwritten law traditions. As one of the alternatives, Chapter 4 examines introduction of, tentatively named, fair work commission.

    Innovation for SMEs involves human aspects as much as financial and technological aspects. In other words, HR management and organizational management make up a large part of innovation. Participatory working practices strengthen the capacity for innovative action, and boost motivation and broaden opportunities to undertake such innovative actions. This process will not only promote organizational learning but also stimulate workers' creativity, leading to innovation of the firm. Chapter 5 confirms evidence of profit-sharing commitment acting as the mechanism of rewarding innovation that drives technological innovation. Strengthening SMEs' innovation capability is related to many of the major policy goals of the Korean economy such as overcoming dual structure of labor market, normalizing productivity growth slowdown and improving quality of jobs. It requires improvement in work organization and compensation scheme with focus on the complementarity of technological innovation, managerial innovation and HR innovation.

     

Jai-Joon Hur's other publications : 14
{Research Series} posts
No Title Author Date Attach
4 Calculation of the 2006 Industrial Accident Insurance Premium Rate by Job Category Jai-joon Hur, Mi-rye Yoon April 28, 2006 Calculation of the 2006 Industrial Accident Insurance Premium Rate by Job Category
3 Determining the impact of ICT on decent work Jun-wook whang, Jai-joon Hur, Kang-shik Choi, Byung-yoo Cheon, Hwan-Joo Seo, Young-soo Lee April 15, 2005 Determining the impact of ICT on decent work
2 The Effect of Information and Communication Technology on Workplace Participation – From the Perspective of Decent Work Junwook Hwang, Jai-Joon Hur April 20, 2004 The Effect of Information and Communication Technology on Workplace Participation – From the Perspective of Decent Work
1 ICT and Skilled Labor Jai-Joon Hur, Hwan-Joo Seo and Young Soo Lee November 29, 2002 ICT and Skilled Labor
123